A view of Station Square, taken from Academy Street in Inverness 1890s; 1900s
Royal Hotel, Inverness 1950s; 1960s

John Home’s map of 1774 sees the houses on the north side of the street show long gardens, even orchards. The name New Street was given to the street in 1765, when the burgh invested in improving and formally laying it out.

With the opening of Royal Inverness Academy in 1792, the street became Academy Street, which is shown in John Wood’s map of 1821

Academy Street is one of the oldest streets in Inverness, which began its development along the line of the defensive ditch or fosse which surrounded the medieval burgh. A timber palisade erected beside the ditch is believed to have survived to around the mid‐1550s.

A range of commercial activities including tanneries grew up along the burgh’s northern boundary and their effluent was placed in the ditch which became known as the ‘Foul Pool’.

The 1716 map by Lewis Petit shows the development of buildings along the northern side of the street, and the dense urban pattern where Kirk Street (now Church Street) and what became Academy Street come together.

John Home’s map of 1774 sees the houses on the north side of the street show long gardens, even orchards. The name New Street was given to the street in 1765, when the burgh invested in improving and formally laying it out.

With the opening of Royal Inverness Academy in 1792, the street became Academy Street, which is shown in John Wood’s map of 1821

Nowadays the built heritage along the street comprises of grand Victorian commercial buildings and a hotel, the Victorian Market and earlier more domestic scale buildings with shops. This rich historical evolution of the street is worthy of protection and enhancement in its own right.